Thursday, February 13, 2014

A Vintage Glass Corn Bread Stick Pan for Thursday Show and Tell

 
Do you have one of these in your collection of vintage glassware? I have searched and failed to find out much information about it.
 
 
I do know it was made by the Wagner Company, a maker of very collectible cast iron ware. One search thought it was made during World War II, with the company turning it's production towards using its' metal for the war effort.
 
 
Another site, I found on the Internet, showed the original wrapper with a price of $1.00. Some websites on eBay, listed today's price as $95.00 .....
 
Mine is simply used for "display only"
Meggie Mac
 

17 comments:

  1. not sure i have ever seen them in glass. usually i see casket iron. how interesting. i enjoyed the info here in this post. hope you are well. do you have snow? we are having a bunch here in VA. lots of ice too. stay warm. ( :

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    1. The information I found was very limited. No snow this week. Last week it was sleet and rain. But, it has been a very cold winter here, in Texas.

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  2. Replies
    1. Just so you know.....I didn't pay a high price for mine, just something I picked up at a yard sale.

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  3. Very nice, I love the glass! I've never seen a glass cornbread pan before. I have one in cast iron and see many of that kind at the antique shops. I don't display mine, but have been thinking recently how I need to get out my vintage things and put them where I can see them and enjoy them.

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    Replies
    1. That is my thinking too! Why have something, if you tuck it away in a cabinet...

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  4. What a lovely treasure. I have a cast iron one, but I love the glass one you have. Cornbread would be yummy today with the snow coming down...hmmmmm, XOXO

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    1. I'm sure the glass one would work too.........Our sun finally came out today, but it's still cold...no snow !

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  5. That is amazing. Isnt it wonderful what you can find?

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    1. It is amazing....sometimes you find great things when you're not actually looking.

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  6. i thought it was for holding cobs of corn on the dinner table, i guess i was wrong. dont think id chance putting it in the oven its too nice, i would be scared it would break.

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    1. The dish could certainly be used for the table, but, the original wrapper had instructions on how to prepare the pan. It also had a corn bread recipe on it. The glass reminds me of a Pyrex pie plate.

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    2. Would you mind sharing the instructions on preparing the glass corn stick pan and the recipe? Thank you

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  7. I've never seen a glass one. It's very pretty!

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  8. I have three of these corn stick glass pans. Can you tell me how to prepare it for baking in the oven.

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  10. A few years ago I bought an aluminum pan and a Miracle Maize glass cornstick pan (internet sellers) just to have something different to make sticks in. After using the MM pan a time or two I found another one online and bought it too. From what I've found, the cast iron manufacturers were devoting their energy to the WW2 war effort and started making glass ovenware for the homemakers to use. I've used both my MM pans - matter of fact just this week even - and they turn out pretty cornsticks. I asked the older ladies at church if their moms or grandma's used any glass cornstick pans during WW2 and none of them had ever seen a glass pan, so of course I hadda bring my pans to let them look. They all agreed that the glass pans are works of art - the corn cob and husk is so detailed - and they wouldn't use them, just have them on display. As for preparing them to bake, I've put butter, cooking spray or shortning in each cob prior to the batter and let it melt in the oven, and I've also went without greasing the pan cobs too. If you don't put anything in the cobs prior to baking, they'll stick to the pan, but after the pan cools for a few minutes they pop right out with a nice shine/glaze because of the smoothness of the glass.

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